Vehicle scales for hinterland roads imminent

first_imgIn an effort to curb the issue of drivers not adhering to weight limits on hinterland roads, the Public Infrastructure Ministry will soon be installing vehicle scales along roadways in interior locations.Public Infrastructure Minister David PattersonPublic Infrastructure Minister David Patterson told the Department of Public Information (DPI) that he foresaw the installation of these scales soon.“I do foresee us addressing this issue in the near future. My ministry has some modern scales, which I will like to put in place. But the challenge with that is that it’s the interior, so I have to situate them near police stations. It will not be ideal to have technicians or persons stopping truck drivers who may not wish to stop, so it has to be by a police station,” he said.The Minister further explained that this move would eventually see new Police Outposts established along hinterland roads. “Where the current Police Stations are located, they are not geared for stopping traffic on the road, they are placed for policing work in your communities.”Minister Patterson disclosed that the relevant authorities have already been engaged, and appealed to drivers to be extremely careful on hinterland roads.Drivers are urged to adhere to rules and avoid travelling while overladen. Residents are also being called on to be vigilant and report overweight vehicles.A sum of $1.5 billion was allocated in the 2018 Budget for road rehabilitation as well as the completion of all rollover projects.Earlier this year, the Ministry had announced that it was taking a firm stance against mining and mining-related operators who cause significant deterioration to roads in the hinterland regions.This was announced after concerns were raised over the misuse of hinterland roads, which is in contravention of the Road Users’ Agreement.According to the Public Infrastructure Ministry, significant sums were expended in the hinterland regions last year for the rehabilitation of roadways. In fact, some $54.5 million was spent in 2016 to repair the Puruni-Itaballi corridor. This corridor is still under maintenance. Furthermore, in 2017, $100 million was allocated to improve the Puruni-Pappishou corridor.While the agreement notes that the Government of Guyana will use its best efforts to keep the road maintained in good condition at all times, road users must play their part by adhering to stipulations such as the prohibition of vehicles weighing more than 60 tons crossing Itaballi-Puruni bridges. Additionally, the agreement notes that users shall be liable to Government for any damage to Government’s property caused by the negligent use of the roadways by their employees and/or their agents.last_img read more

DONEGAL AUTHORS FEATURE IN UNIQUE ‘AROUND THE FARM GATE’ BOOK

first_imgTwo Donegal authors have had their stories included as part of ‘Around The Farm Gate, a unique anthology of Irish rural memories which is hotly-tipped to be a best-seller this year.Moira Gallagher hails from Creeslough but now lives in Lifford. Married with three children, the retired teacher’s story ‘The Potato Sowers’ tells the tale of how her community took the lead in times to scarcity to become world famous for their sowing exploits. She compares that world with the present day when the wheel has come full circle.Joe Coyle was born in Glasgow but came back with his family to live in Donegal when he was nine years old. Shortly after his return to the Gweedore area, he witnessed the scene which is the central piece of his story ‘ The Mice In The Meadow.’ Joe is also one of the country’s top newspaper and magazine designer and was responsible for the design of the book – from his Gweedore offices – in which his and 49 other stories appear.Around The Farm Gate, published by Ballpoint Press in collaboration with RTE, is a unique collection of 50 stories written by different authors from around the country detailing their experiences from the time in which they grew up.The stories are a brief snapshot in time and offer a rare glimpse of our recent history, encapsulating and preserving the traditions of several generations in a rapidly disappearing rural landscape.The presenter of RTE Radio 1’s popular Countrywide programme, Damien O’Reilly said: “Around the Farm Gate is a rich tapestry of unique memories and stories of life on the land in rural Ireland, a collection of events that happened but are seldom documented, until now. “From threshing oats, driving cattle to the local street market, thinning beet or cocking hay, the experience of growing up in rural Ireland is full of anecdotes and yarns focused mainly on life on the land. Too often though, these stories die with the beholder and are often left untold.“Growing up in rural Ireland for much of the 20th century wasn’t easy. Farming life was a tough existence but through a combination of a strong faith and an honest work ethic, farming families managed to keep the show on the road and much of that life shines through in this wonderful collection of stories from across the country.”DONEGAL AUTHORS FEATURE IN UNIQUE ‘AROUND THE FARM GATE’ BOOK was last modified: October 9th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Around the Farm Gatedonegallast_img read more