PZ Cussons Ghana Limited (PZC.gh) 2014 Abridged Report

first_imgPZ Cussons Ghana Limited (PZC.gh) listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange under the Retail sector has released it’s 2014 abridged results.For more information about PZ Cussons Ghana Limited (PZC.gh) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the PZ Cussons Ghana Limited (PZC.gh) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: PZ Cussons Ghana Limited (PZC.gh)  2014 abridged results.Company ProfilePZ Cussons Ghana Limited is a consumer goods company in Ghana which manufactures, distributes and sells electrical appliances and healthcare products such as soaps, cosmetics and pharmaceutical products. The company operates in 4 categories: personal care, home care, food and nutrition and electrical appliances. Personal care brands include Camel, Carex, Cussons Baby, Imperial Leather, Premier and Premier Cool and Robb. Brands in the electrical appliance range include Thermocool; the nutritional range includes Nunu and the home care range includes Morning Fresh. PZ Cussons Ghana Limited is a subsidiary of PZ Cussons (Holdings) Limited. PZ Cussons Ghana Limited is listed on the Ghana Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Chobe Holdings Limited (CHOBE.bw) HY2019 Interim Report

first_imgChobe Holdings Limited (CHOBE.bw) listed on the Botswana Stock Exchange under the Tourism sector has released it’s 2019 interim results for the half year.For more information about Chobe Holdings Limited (CHOBE.bw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Chobe Holdings Limited (CHOBE.bw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Chobe Holdings Limited (CHOBE.bw)  2019 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileChobe Holdings Limited owns and operates eleven eco-tourism lodges and camps on leased land in Northern Botswana and the Caprivi Strip in Namibia through its subsidiaries. The holding company operates under two well-known hospitality brands; Desert & Delta Safaris and Ker & Downey Botswana. The eco-tourism group has a combined capacity of 314 beds, and provides added services for its guests such as transfers and private safari tours and game viewing. Safari Air is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Chobe Holdings Limited which provides an air charter service to transport guests to and from its safari camps and lodges. The company also has interests in agricultural operations, property rental and a reservation service.last_img read more

Whatever Brexit looks like, investing in these FTSE 100 stocks makes sense

first_img “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Image source: Getty Images James J. McCombie | Friday, 17th January, 2020 I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Whatever Brexit looks like, investing in these FTSE 100 stocks makes sense See all posts by James J. McCombie Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.center_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares James J. McCombie owns shares of Diageo and Unilever. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended GlaxoSmithKline and Unilever. The Motley Fool UK has recommended AstraZeneca, Diageo, and InterContinental Hotels Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The United Kingdom is due to leave the European Union at 11 pm on 31 January 2020. Following the withdrawal, a transition period of 11 months begins. The UK will cease to be a member of EU institutions but will follow their rules. Following the rules means the trading relationship remains the same during the transition.The UK government hopes to negotiate a trade deal by the end of the transition period. Failing to reach an agreement means leaving the EU on World Trade Organization rules. Alternatively, more time could be requested to reach a trade agreement.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…There is still a great deal of uncertainty for the economy, markets, and investors to navigate. Holding a few large and stable FTSE 100 stocks in your portfolio could help smooth a potentially bumpy ride.Crossing continentsIntercontinental Hotels Group has told investors that Brexit is unlikely to have any material impact on its operations or strategy. It owns, manages, franchises, and leases hotels all over the world. 61% of revenues come from the Americas and Greater China. Europe, the Middle East, and Africa account for 30% of revenues, so UK revenue exposure is likely to be minuscule.The company presents its accounts in US dollars. If the US dollar strengthens by five cents against sterling, then profit before tax increases by $4.1m. Net liabilities decrease by $25.8m with a five-cent rise. A bad deal or no deal could send sterling tumbling, but be a boon for Intercontinental.A global slowdown, with less spending on travel and leisure for business and pleasure, will hurt Intercontinental. However, a UK-specific slump will not matter too much.Betting on brandsUnilever sells products that people love to eat, drink, and use to take care of themselves and their homes. Some of Diageo‘s alcoholic beverages have been enjoyed by drinkers for centuries. Both of these consumer giants have operations across the globe and sell their wares in hundreds of countries. Like Intercontinental, their exposure to the UK economy is relatively small.Strong brands, loved all over the world, will keep revenues high even if people in the UK start cutting back.At least you have your healthPrescription charges in the UK are heavily subsidised or cost nothing. Drugs administered in the hospital are free at the point of service. Even if things turn sour in the UK, AstraZeneca and GlaxoSmithKline‘s revenues should be safe. Astra and Glaxo are pharmaceutical giants and make sales in hundreds of countries across the globe. Having relatively low exposure to the UK is, again, a salve for a tricky Brexit.No surprisesThese five companies I have mentioned are members of the FTSE 100 and generally well known, and they may seem like self-evident picks to face the uncertainty of Brexit. That is not a bad thing. Until the risk goes away, holding some defensive stocks is not a bad strategy. If everyone has the same idea and starts moving into these stocks, that supports the price.All of the stocks mentioned pay investors a consistent, ordinary dividend. If their prices are dragged down by the market, the dividend will buffer some of the price decreases.If you are looking for other suggestions, you might be interested in the stocks that did well after the 2016 referendum. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Enter Your Email Addresslast_img read more

The Rightmove share price is up 7% today as house prices climb. Here’s what I’d do now

first_imgThe Rightmove share price is up 7% today as house prices climb. Here’s what I’d do now Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares See all posts by Harvey Jones Enter Your Email Address I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Harvey Jones | Friday, 7th August, 2020 | More on: RMV Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Harvey Jones has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Rightmove. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.center_img “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Image source: Getty Images The Rightmove (LSE: RMV) share price has recovered well from the stock market crash, with a helping hand from chancellor Rishi Sunak’s stamp duty holiday. It’s up more than 7% this morning, despite reporting that first-half revenues dropped by a third. Investors have also been encouraged by new Halifax figures showing house prices lifted 1.6% in July.The UK’s largest property portal has reported a sharp increase in activity, as pent-up demand is unleashed and owners rush to buy a new home after tiring of being locked down in their old one.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…This should help underpin the Rightmove share price. However, I can’t help worrying that investors have got too excited today. The FTSE 100 company’s revenues fell 34% year-on-year, reflecting the impact of its 75% discount on customer fees between April and June.FTSE 100 growth starAverage revenue per advertiser fell by the same percentage, from £1,077 to £712. That’s a blow. But at least it’s helping to keep customers on the site. Investors are clearly hoping this was a one-off hit, and the Rightmove share price will hold firm as Britons go property crazy once again. Operating profits were 43% lower at £61.7m, despite a 7% reduction in operating costs to £33.1m. Still, making any kind of profit in the first six months of this unprecedented year is an achievement. The group had £50.3m in cash at 30 June, which is up from £36.3m at the end of last year.Current housing market buoyancy may not last though. Furlough is due to end in October, hitting buyers in the pockets. On the other hand, that might lead to an increase in forced sellers, boosting site activity (albeit for the wrong reasons).Rightmove isn’t paying any dividends at the moment. However, management said today it remains committed to returning all free cash flow to shareholders through dividends and share buybacks as soon as “prudent”.We don’t know when that will be, of course. Rightmove doesn’t feel able to issue forward guidance at the moment, although it’s hardly alone in that.The Rightmove share price is expensiveThe extension of the Help to Buy scheme and record low mortgage rates should keep the property market ticking over. What happens after that depends on the shape of the recovery. The stamp duty holiday is due to end on 31 March, and that could depress activity from January.The Rightmove share price trades 15% higher than a year ago, which compares well to a 17% drop on the FTSE 100 over the same period. The site retains a dominant market position, with a 50% listings lead over its nearest competitor. This gives it welcome pricing power and allows it to shrug off estate agent grumbles about costs. They’ve joined forces to launch OnTheMarket as a competitor, but Rightmove is top dog for now.My big worry is that the Rightmove share price looks pricey, giving current uncertainties. It trades at almost 50 times forward earnings.last_img read more

Heroes from Honduras: Margarita Murillo, ¡presente!

first_imgMargarita MurilloThe children and youth of Honduras will one day look back at this period in history with great lament. U.S. imperialist policy has resulted not only in massive forced migration but also in decades of brutal instability and turmoil in their beloved homeland.In fact, photojournalist Tomás Ayuso notes that the youth of Honduras have coined a phrase of their limited hope — “the right to grow old” — as death and uncertainty have become the main options for the vast majority of young people. (NPR, Aug. 19)But these conditions have also borne beloved heroes.One of those is Margarita Murillo, a revolutionary campesina leader who was assassinated by death squads on Aug. 27, 2014.Four years after Margarita’s death, her children and the Honduras resistance movement in New York City will commemorate her life on Aug. 25 with film footage, speeches, food and music at the International Action Center.Under the banner, “We continue to demand Justice! ¡Margarita vive!” the story of this leader will be told by her three children, who now reside in NYC, as well as by others.A heroic lifeMargarita was 54 years old when she was found riddled with bullets. Three men in ski masks, who were connected to right-wing death squads, killed her as she worked the fields in her village El Planon in northern Honduras.Montserrat, one of Margarita’s daughters, told TeleSur in 2017: “It was the hardest moment of my life. It was the moment that my mom became a martyr of the Honduran resistance.”Margarita’s children have all applied for political asylum in the U.S. and plan to continue her work. Two of her children have won asylum already.Her family and the movement describe Margarita’s life as one filled with a yearning for justice. She became an activist at a young age and understood, based on her own family’s poverty, the need not only for struggle but for full liberation. Margarita recounted in a radio interview that her family had been so poor that sometimes they were forced to eat grass to survive.Margarita became deeply influenced by the rising tide of revolutionary resistance in Central America. During her life, she traveled to El Salvador and Nicaragua to help the movement in those countries — a true internationalist.At 13, she joined the National Union of Peasants. At 15, she participated in the March of Hunger, which has become an annual march in Honduras, where the lack of food is constant.But Margarita did not just yearn for the right to food. She fought to demand that the land be given to those who worked it. She participated in land occupations and survived only because she escaped when many of her comrades were killed.Margarita experienced repression at a very early age. At 16, she was raped, tortured and beaten. Nothing stopped her yearning for justice, however. As she grew, she became a leading member of the FNRP (National Popular Resistance Front) of Honduras. She helped establish the Federation of Peasant Women and the National Center of Field Workers, as well as the Sula Valley Forum.When the progressive presidency of Manuel Zelaya was overturned in 2009 by a U.S. coup, Margarita fought even more. She did not want merely a fair election. She wanted full liberation from the multinational corporations.Even though her two sons were kidnapped and beaten, Margarita fought on. Samuel, one of those sons, resides in NYC and has won asylum. On May Day in NYC, Samuel and family marched with pictures of Margarita.Montserrat, despite being held at the border along with her baby daughter in the “hieleras” — the freezing cold detention center — remains optimistic. She, Samuel and daughter Kenia — Margarita’s children — continue to inspire everyone they meet. They fight on just like their mother.Montserrat says all the time: “My mom was a fighter. She gave up her life for the resistance movement.”Just like Berta Isabel Cáceres Flores (Lenca) of Honduras, who was also murdered by death squads, Margarita will live on. They live on in the struggles of her children and in all the young people who are fighting until victory for their homeland.Margarita Murillo, ¡presente!FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Caltech: Good Vibrations

first_img More Cool Stuff Community News 2 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business News Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Subscribe Herbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWomen Love These Great Tips To Making Your Teeth Look WhiterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Tips To Rejuvenate Winter Dry, Chapped LipsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautycenter_img Michael Shapiro (left) and Doris Tsao. Photo by HC Van UrfalianFor their 1966 song, “Good Vibrations,” the Beach Boys assembled an unusual mix of instruments—including a jaw harp, a cello, and an Electro-Theremin—to produce one of their biggest hits. By arranging sound waves in a unique and particular way, they were able to elicit a positive response.Many doctors and researchers have the same goal. After all, the same “excitations” that helped the Beach Boys usher in an era of feel-good pop—the sound waves that propagate through air and water, bringing notes of music to our ears—are also noninvasively able to explore body tissues, helping to visualize babies in the womb, heal back pain, or even deliver chemotherapeutics to targeted tumors.One of the most-used “good vibrations” in medicine is ultrasound—sound waves delivered at a frequency inaudible to the human ear. Ultrasound has been used in medical settings since the 1940s for diagnostics and in recent years has gained popularity for use in physical therapy and to speed up drug delivery.But that, say chemical engineer Mikhail Shapiro and biologist Doris Tsao, isn’t all that ultrasound can do. The two, who met shortly after Shapiro was hired to the Caltech faculty in late 2013, have joined forces to develop a new technology that uses ultrasound to both map and determine the function of interconnected brain networks. Their goal: to one day be able to change abnormal neural activity deep within the brain using pulses of sound. The idea is so intriguing that, in September 2014, theirs became one of 58 projects nationwide to be awarded funding by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as part of President Obama’s Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnology—or BRAIN—Initiative.They are an ideal pair for this project: Shapiro’s lab focuses on ways to use different forms of energy—like magnetic fields or sound waves—to penetrate deep into the brain in order to image or control specific processes, like neural function. Tsao, for her part, works to pinpoint specific areas of the brain where functions such as object perception occur. Together—and with the help of postdoctoral fellows Jerome Lacroix in Shapiro’s lab and Tomo Sato in Tsao’s lab—they hope to combine their specialties to use sound waves to inhibit or excite different areas of the brain in order to obtain a specific response.Their idea plays off of a technique called deep brain stimulation (DBS), which uses implanted electrodes to send electrical impulses to tightly targeted regions of the brain; those impulses block abnormal nerve signals to address severe, treatment-resistant depression and epilepsy, among other movement and affective disorders. The problem is that, as you might imagine, the technique requires highly invasive surgery, during portions of which the device’s recipient needs to be awake.“If you could stimulate the regions involved in such conditions in a noninvasive way—with ultrasound waves, for instance—it would be a huge advantage,” Tsao says.They have reason to believe that’s possible. For one thing, scientists at other institutions—including neurobiologist Jamie Tyler at Arizona State University—have shown that you can use ultrasound to stimulate brain cells in rodent models.“For example, Tyler showed you could make a mouse flick its tail when certain parts of its brain were stimulated in the motor cortex,” says Tsao, whose introduction to Tyler at a meeting a few years ago inspired her to start her own investigations into controlling brain cells with ultrasound waves. “It became obvious to me that if this could work in humans, it would have tremendous impact. With ultrasonic neuromodulation, not only could we stimulate any part of the human brain noninvasively, but we could ask subjects about their experience and do it all inside an MRI scanner, the data from which we could use to map the connectivity and gain a greater understanding of how the brain functions.”The problem is that the mechanism for how the neurons become excited or inhibited by ultrasound is largely a question mark. In fact, at the most basic level, no one quite knows how DBS works, either. So Shapiro and Tsao are, to some degree, starting from scratch.To begin, the team wants to study precisely what happens at the cellular and molecular level when ultrasound waves come into contact with certain neurons. So they have built an experimental setup with which they can use microscopy and electrophysiology techniques to look at what’s happening to cells and molecules while they are being bombarded by ultrasound waves. “You need a way for the sound waves to have more or less unfettered access to your cells,” explains Shapiro.Their solution was a big water tank into which an ultrasound transducer is submerged; brain cells, grown on a nutrient gel, are then placed on the surface of the water. Shapiro and Tsao can look at the cells from above with a normal microscope; they also have an electrophysiology device in contact with the cells to measure electrical activity in the neurons. “Constructing this exotic setup was the first step, and we’re there,” Shapiro says.Next, they want to use this setup to figure out what mechanism excites brain cells when they’re hit with ultrasound. From a technical point of view, they also want to figure out the limits of the technology and how to optimize it for use in different types of animals, with the goal of eventually testing it in humans.“This technology has a long way to go,” Shapiro notes. “But if at the conclusion of our three-year grant we’ve achieved all of our goals, we’ll be in a really great position to expand our research, maybe even into human trials.”Tsao, for her part, is already looking even further down the road. “I’d like to be able to pass this technique on to people at Caltech like John O’Doherty and Antonio Rangel who could potentially use it in their work on behaviors like addiction that are regulated by the brain” she says. “So if it does work, there are a large number of people who are at the ready to translate this. And that’s really exciting.”POWER VOCALSFinding a natural way to power those deep-brain stimulators once they are buried in the brains of people—as well as other devices implanted in or near the head—is the task electrical engineer Hyuck Choo has set himself.“If you use a battery, you have to replace it at some point,” he explains. “And if the device is already in the body, that means you have to have another surgical procedure. This makes people hesitant to use implants. If you can have a more permanent power source that continuously powers the devices, it would be a big advantage. So I’ve been looking for an energy source that we could reliably and easily harvest, or capture and store.”Choo thinks he’s found a solution, one we use all the time: our voice. He wants to harness the vibrations that vocal cords make when we talk, and use them to power implantable devices. So, for example, a deaf person could sing a song to charge up their cochlear implant.Last summer, Choo tasked undergraduate Sophia Chen with testing this idea—that our voices could be used to power devices—as part of her Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF). “First, I analyzed the vocal-cord vibrations throughout the skull, which basically showed that we could harness those vibrations and turn them into storable energy,” explains Chen.Sophia Chen attaching sensors to the face of a volunteer. Photo by Lance HayashidaTo then test the strength of the vibrations, she simply attached tiny accelerometers to different areas of the head in 8 volunteer participants, one of whom was Choo. She asked the volunteers to hum at a constant frequency; then hum on a scale, from lowest to highest frequency; and then read aloud.“Sophia found that, no matter the vocal activity being performed, the acousto-mechanical vibrations were concentrated at a single frequency for 80 to 90 percent of the time,” says Choo. “By focusing on one frequency, we can really optimize the harvesting process.”This suggests that—instead of having wires running from the brain to a power source typically placed under the skin of your chest for deep-brain stimulation, or batteries mounted behind the ear for cochlear implants—a device harvesting energy from vocal cords could also be implantable. “There would be no wires sticking out or anything; everything would be inside the head,” says Choo. “That would be an advantage of this approach.”He is now working on building such a vibration-harnessing device, inspired by an off-the-shelf piezo-electric setup—a device that harvests energy from pressure, including that derived from sound vibrations. The team’s challenge is to scale down that technology so it can be implanted in the body while leaving it sizeable enough to generate the power needed, utilizing the energy provided. “Best we can tell right now from the data we have, a person would have to sing their favorite songs for about 10 to 20 minutes twice a day to keep their device powered,” says Choo.He notes that there is no worry of overdoing it, should one want to sing an entire opera or gab with friends for hours. A safety feature can be built into the device to cut off the charging process once the implant has enough juice.Because Chen—now finishing up her sophomore year at Caltech— has coursework to deal with, Choo and his lab are taking the SURF work she did and running with it. But Choo gives Chen all the credit for what he calls “a very viable option” for solving this medical challenge.“The right project for the right student makes a big difference,” says Choo. “We are continuously working on this project, and when the time comes to test the energy-harvesting device that we fabricate, I hope Sophia will come back and help us again.”SOUND IT OUTUltrasound machines and energy harvesters use regular old sound waves in unique and novel ways. But Caltech senior postdoctoral scholar Carly Donahue has taken a different tack; she helped devise techniques to try to change the way those sound waves behave, with the goal of giving sound more power in medical applications.In a research group lead by Chiara Daraio, Donahue and graduate student Paul Anzel worked to produce highly focused, high-amplitude acoustic signals called sound bullets because of their destructive power. The manipulated sound waves act much like a tidal wave, appearing to move by pushing all their energy forward in a single crest instead of in the classic squiggly (and weaker) waveform. The hope is that these focused packets of energy could one day be used to destroy unwanted tissue or trim away tumors, all without doing the kind of damage to the body that a real bullet would do.This work really began in 2010, when Daraio and her lab reported that they had learned how to control the way in which sound travels, using granular materials—in their case, macroscopic stainless-steel ball bearings, or spheres, assembled into a chain. An array of 21 such parallel chains created what the researchers call an acoustic lens—a pulse of sound pressure initiated at one end travels down each chain in much the same way motion in the Newton’s cradle children’s toy travels from the first ball to the last in a chain without moving the ones in the middle. The point of it all? To use the lens to focus all that pressure, all that sound, at one spot, creating a sort of bullet of sound.“It’s a simple concept, but it has such incredibly interesting physics,” Donahue says. “The whole idea of the lens is being able to control acoustic signals in a completely different, non-linear way.” According to Anzel, who is studying applied physics, the best way to focus sound at a specific point is to shape the way the signal moves through space.“What we took advantage of is that, just by squeezing a row of bearings, you can cause a signal to travel through it faster,” he says. “So, if you create rows of ball bearings and squeeze the outer rows more than the inner ones, you can control the speed of the sound pulses so that they arrive at the same time from a bunch of different directions to target an area.”Building on the 2010 results, which focused the sound waves to penetrate a solid material, Donahue and a team of colleagues began testing the concept in liquid. They also began thinking about applications: sound bullets traveling through liquids could be used to image and evaluate the structures of bridges, says Anzel, or solid objects on the floor of the ocean, much like weaker ultrasound waves are used to image the body.“We wanted to try this in liquid because, if we want to do medical applications, we have to deal with the fact that obviously the body is not solid,” Donahue explains. “For liquid, we had to think about how to actually transmit a wave from a solid material into a fluid, and the extra complications involved.”To create the lens in water, Donahue, Daraio, Anzel, and others first aligned the same spheres they’d used in their solid lens, but put each chain into individual tubes. Then, they constructed a waterproof interface—made of a glass disk and polymer encasing—so that they could submerge part of the tubes in water without the spheres falling out. After arranging the tubes next to each other to form the same kind of array they’re created in the solid version of the lens, they then generated a sound pulse, controlling each wave’s timing and amplitude.“The most surprising part of the study was how important the materials used in the lens-water interface were for controlling how the sound travels,” Daraio says. “We knew it would play a substantial role in the formation of the sound bullet and the energy trans- fer to the water, but we had not fully realized the complexity required in its design. This is something Carly really made important progress on.”A much smaller setup would be needed for use in the human body, so Daraio’s research group is investigating solutions for the miniaturization of such a device. And Donahue is now exploring how contacts between different materials work on smaller scales—at the microscale or even the nanoscale—where different forces may come into play. “We want to know the basic forces and how things behave to see if it will work,” she says.If successful, these tiniest of sound bullets might one day be used to noninvasively blast kidney stones and gallstones, remove blood clots, and potentially provide a more accurate imaging alternative, one that could produce even clearer views of the body than do current ultrasound technologies.“Reducing the device’s size would enable us to reach wavelengths of interest for medical applications, and I hope to see this realized in the next few years,” says Daraio. “It is exciting to see many years of hard work and passion for fundamental research leading to the creation of an instrument that may improve everyday life for many people.” EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Top of the News Make a comment Science and Technology Caltech: Good Vibrations By KATIE NEITH Published on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 | 11:10 am Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

How Low Can Foreclosure Rates Go?

first_img  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Foreclosure, Journal, Market Studies, News The ongoing downhill journey of foreclosure activity continued in May, with starts for the month hitting the second-lowest total in more than 17 years, according to the latest data from Black Knight, Inc.Black Knight’s First Look at mortgage performance data for May 2018 revealed a total of 44,900 foreclosure starts in May, down 8.92 percent since April and 19.53 percent year-over-year (YOY). Nationwide, only 303,000 mortgages were in active foreclosure in May, down 11,000 since April and by 118,000 year-over-year. The national foreclosure rate for May was only 0.59 percent—the lowest rate in some 15 years.A little over 2 million properties were 30 or more days past due, or in foreclosure, as of May 2018. That total was down by nearly 30,000 month-over-month, and down by 177,000 year-over-year.Assuming the current rate of decline continues, Black Knight estimates that foreclosure inventories should hit the pre-recession average (measured between 2000-2005) by early Q3 2018.May also marked the fifth month in a row to see declining delinquencies. The total U.S. loan delinquency rate, measuring loans that are 30 or more days past due but not yet in foreclosure, was 3.64 percent for May. That marked a month-over-month decrease of 0.84 percent, and a year-over-year change of -4.08 percent, according to Black Knight.The top five states by non-current percentage include Mississippi (9.49 percent, down 6.55 percent YOY), Louisiana (7.47 percent, down 13.99 percent YOY), Alabama (6.56 percent, down 7.97 percent YOY), West Virginia (6.27 percent, down 8.19 percent YOY), and Florida (6.07 percent, up 16.55 percent YOY).The bottom five states by non-current percentage include Minnesota (2.29 percent, down 8.71 percent YOY), Washington (2.22 percent, down 19.99 percent YOY), North Dakota (2.21 percent, down 2.0 percent YOY), Oregon (2.12 percent, down 21.32 percent YOY), and Colorado (1.90 percent, down 10.21 percent YOY). Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: The Housing Market: Six Months After Tax Cuts Next: CFPB vs. PHH Dismissed: RESPA Enforcement Implications Black Knight Delinquencies Foreclosure Inventory Foreclosure Starts Foreclosures 2018-06-21 David Wharton Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago How Low Can Foreclosure Rates Go? David Wharton, Managing Editor at the Five Star Institute, is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington, where he received his B.A. in English and minored in Journalism. Wharton has over 16 years’ experience in journalism and previously worked at Thomson Reuters, a multinational mass media and information firm, as Associate Content Editor, focusing on producing media content related to tax and accounting principles and government rules and regulations for accounting professionals. Wharton has an extensive and diversified portfolio of freelance material, with published contributions in both online and print media publications. Wharton and his family currently reside in Arlington, Texas. He can be reached at [email protected] The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agocenter_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago June 21, 2018 3,038 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Share Save Subscribe Tagged with: Black Knight Delinquencies Foreclosure Inventory Foreclosure Starts Foreclosures Sign up for DS News Daily Home / Daily Dose / How Low Can Foreclosure Rates Go? Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: David Whartonlast_img read more

Big names kick off Derry’s year as City of Culture with huge concert

first_imgNews Pinterest PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal Facebook Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers Google+ Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme Pinterest Girls Aloud star Nadine Coyle and Snow Patrol frontman Gary Lightbody will help kick off celebrations for Derry’s year as City of Culture this weekend.They will join Neil Hannon, Phil Coulter, The Undertones, Dana, and Amanda Burton for the opening concert in Derry on Sunday.The Sons and Daughters gig aims to showcase a host of artists from the North with international reputations to reflect Derry’s cultural achievements through music, word and song.The event is the first major celebration of 2013 and is being staged in The Venue, a new purpose-built pavilion in the former military barracks in Ebrington Square.Mayor of Derry Kevin Campbell says it will be one of the highlights of the year: Previous articleOmagh civil trial hears mobile phone evidenceNext articleMeat factory ceases production following burger tests News Highland Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released Twitter Facebook WhatsApp 70% of Cllrs nationwide threatened, harassed and intimidated over past 3 years – Report WhatsApp Big names kick off Derry’s year as City of Culture with huge concert Google+ HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week By News Highland – January 18, 2013 last_img read more

“Allow Virtual Courts To Continue As An Option”: All India Association of Jurists Moves Supreme Court

first_imgTop Stories”Allow Virtual Courts To Continue As An Option”: All India Association of Jurists Moves Supreme Court Srishti Ojha13 March 2021 4:31 AMShare This – xAll India Association of Jurists move the Supreme Court to allow virtual courts to continue as an option and increase diversity in the Bar. The plea has urged the Court to protect right to legal practise especially in Supreme Court, of members of the Bar who due to different ailments, old age, and other physical dispositions are alienated from physically appearing before Supreme Court in…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginAll India Association of Jurists move the Supreme Court to allow virtual courts to continue as an option and increase diversity in the Bar. The plea has urged the Court to protect right to legal practise especially in Supreme Court, of members of the Bar who due to different ailments, old age, and other physical dispositions are alienated from physically appearing before Supreme Court in post Covid pre-vaccine scenario.According to the petitioner, the option of appearing before the Supreme Court through virtual means should be allowed to continue as a matter of right. The petitioner association is an association of legal practitioners, comprising of Advocates, law teachers, retired Judges and other members of Citizenry interested in inter-relationship between judicial process and social justice. The plea filed by Advocate Shriram P. seeks to fulfil multifold but inter related goals of increasing justice to far off citizens of India, and protecting their legal rights, including right to virtual appearance as an option. The petitioner has clarified that the present petition filed for allowing virtual appearance as an option as a matter of right is not a public interest petition, as it has been filed for rights of the members of the Bar who are in turn members of the petitioner Association.The petitioner Association, on behalf of members of the Bar all around the Country, seek continuance of virtual courts as an option to enable their fundamental rights under Article 19(1)(g) of the Constitution made possible by twin forces of technology and opportunity given by calamity of Covid19.The plea has stated that its not confined to rights of lawyers and wishes to urge and assert that access to justice is not curbed but increased with multiplied diversity and reduced costs when option of virtual courts exists.According to the petitioner, the Supreme Court by functioning virtually has not only kept its door open every single day even during the pandemic, but also opened doors of justice much wider to large sections of population which are alienated by cost and geographical factors.The plea has further stated that due to non availability of vaccines at large scale, the fact that not everyone has been vaccinated, and the fact that effectiveness of vaccines have still not been proven, the risk of the most vulnerable members of the Bar while attending Court physically is very high.While referring to communications between members of the Bar and High Court Chief Justices, where examples of malls and cinema halls having been opened has been given the petitioner Association has stated that, the comparison is wrong on the footing that Court of Law mandates attendance and there is no choice unlike the examples quotedNext Storylast_img read more

Six due in court in New IRA probe

first_img Twitter Six people are due in court this morning as part of a PSNI investigation into the dissident republican group the New IRA.Seven people have already been charged with directing terrorism and other offences and the five today will face similar charges.It follows a series of raids across Northern Ireland early on Tuesday morning.All six will appear before Belfast Magistrates Court via video link. Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Facebook WhatsApp Six due in court in New IRA probe Homepage BannerNews Google+ Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook By News Highland – August 24, 2020 center_img Pinterest WhatsApp Previous article‘Intense’ rainfall expected in Donegal as yellow weather warning issuedNext articleNew survey reveals fears over permanent pub closures News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Twitter Pinterest Google+ Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Community Enhancement Programme open for applicationslast_img read more